Does your country have set gendered language?

Posts55Likes36Joined23/3/2021LocationDavao / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish

In my country, Filipino / Tagalog is a gender-neutral language but gender is usually differentiated in certain Spanish loanwords by way of the suffixes -a (feminine) and -o (masculine). It is more obvious with how we name kids and mention occupations. 



- By small and simple things are great things brought to pass! 

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#1
Posts187Likes65Joined19/9/2019LocationSão Paulo / BR
Native
Portuguese
Learning English, French, Italian, Spanish

Portuguese is similar to Spanish, so it's the same -a (feminine) and -o (masculine), which causes a lot of trouble for learners!

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#2
Posts536Likes328Joined8/7/2018LocationAlmeria / ES
Native
English
Other Arabic - Egyptian, French, German, Spanish

English has a nuetral gendered language system and I must say I struggle with remembering to use gender in Spanish I just forget a lot of the time I also am unsure exactly when I need to apply it... when I speak about objects I am fine but with myself I tend to use the masculine when I shouldn't as I am concentrating on conjugating the verb to I... generally ending in o and then I forget

I hope that those I am speaking to don't genuinely receive what I am saying as I am a _______ man hahaha

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#3
Posts55Likes36Joined23/3/2021LocationDavao / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish

Valeria.Fontes wrote:
Portuguese is similar to Spanish, so it's the same -a (feminine) and -o (masculine), which causes a lot of trouble for learners!


We sometimes use the -ita or -ito for some gendered words that are "little or small". This is of Spanish origin too.

- By small and simple things are great things brought to pass! 

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#4
Posts536Likes328Joined8/7/2018LocationAlmeria / ES
Native
English
Other Arabic - Egyptian, French, German, Spanish

july.lullalove wrote:
Valeria.Fontes wrote:
Portuguese is similar to Spanish, so it's the same -a (feminine) and -o (masculine), which causes a lot of trouble for learners!

We sometimes use the -ita or -ito for some gendered words that are "little or small". This is of Spanish origin too.


yes definitely Spanish, they use -ito and -ita or illo illa as a suffix for little and -azo -aza -on -ona -ote-ota for big...

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1
#5
Posts55Likes36Joined23/3/2021LocationDavao / PH
Native
Tagalog
Learning Japanese, Portuguese, Spanish



yes definitely Spanish, they use -ito and -ita or illo illa as a suffix for little and -azo -aza -on -ona -ote-ota for big...
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That's a lot to remember! Wow.


- By small and simple things are great things brought to pass! 

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#6
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